Frances Stewart

Photo of Frances Stewart

Assistant Professor Canada Research Chair in Northern Wildlife Biology Faculty of Science Biology Waterloo, Ontario fstewart@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-1970 ext. 2889

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Julie Kalbfleisch
Interim Director: Communications and Issues Management
jkalbfleisch@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I have recently joined the Biology department at Laurier (2021) where I lead the WILDlab – a group of motivated students and researchers that focus on applied issues of northern wildlife biology. Our work involves field projects, modelling, and communication and collaboration with local peoples. ...

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Bio/Research

I have recently joined the Biology department at Laurier (2021) where I lead the WILDlab – a group of motivated students and researchers that focus on applied issues of northern wildlife biology. Our work involves field projects, modelling, and communication and collaboration with local peoples. Prior to joining Laurier, I was a postdoctoral research scientist at Natural Resources Canada (Victoria, BC) where my collaborators and I conducted several forecasting and risk analyses outlining boreal caribou management strategies. I hold a PhD from the University of Victoria in Environmental Studies with a focus on applied wildlife management, and two degrees (BScH and MSc) from the University of Guelph in Ecology.

The main focus of my research is quantifying the response of wildlife to natural and anthropogenic landscape change. Our research group approaches this focus using multiple techniques and vantage points, focusing on Canada's north as a key area undergoing rapid change. We conduct large-scale remote camera trapping projects to quantify the occurrence of wildlife species in relation to existing landscape features – and in relation to each other – helping us better understand how the distribution and abundance of wildlife may change as the land changes. We also use simulation and computer forecasting techniques to apply existing information to anticipated future conditions, quantifying spatially explicit trade-offs between proposed management techniques (e.g. protected areas, species reintroductions, predator management). Throughout, our work emphasizes bringing knowledge types, and sectors, together to inform decisions of wildlife management.


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